UC Transparency Act of 2017 Signed Into Law by Governor Brown

(SACRAMENTO) This afternoon, AB 1655, The UC Transparency Act of 2017 authored by Assemblymember Timothy S. Grayson (D-Concord), was signed by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. AB 1655 prohibits the University of California Office of the President (UCOP) from intentionally misleading the State Auditor and requires greater transparency in UC cost reporting.

Upon passage Assemblymember Grayson said the following: “I want to thank Governor Brown for signing AB 1655 into law. This bill is critical to restoring the public trust that was eroded by recent findings about the actions of the UC Office of the President and their intentional interference with a State Auditor’s investigation. Students and taxpayers need to know that UC leadership will be good stewards of the institution, and this bill provides much needed accountability.”

Assemblymember Grayson Fulfills Commitment to Deliver on Housing

(SAN FRANCISCO) – Today, Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. signed into law comprehensive legislation aimed at addressing the ongoing housing crisis in California. Included in the package were AB 879 authored by freshman Assemblymember Tim Grayson (D-Concord) and SB 35 coauthored by Grayson.
 
At the conclusion of the ceremony Grayson stated, “When I started serving my district in January, I knew special interests in Sacramento could stand in the way of making real progress on this issue. Today, I am proud that we have overcome that challenge and are delivering on our promises to address our state’s housing crisis. I look forward to continuing to work on this issue and ensuring that we reach our goal of bringing California home in the years ahead.”  

Opinion: Toll increases are not the “answer” we deserve

Where is the equity? That is what East Bay legislators have been asking proponents of Regional Measure 3 (RM3) to increase our six state-owned bridge tolls by up to $3 per crossing. Unfortunately, the problem is even worse than most realize and the wrong people are being asked to foot the bill for the Bay Area’s transportation problems.

SB 595, currently under discussion in the Legislature, would require the nine Bay Area Counties to hold a referendum on RM3 next year. Massive investment in the Bay Area’s transportation infrastructure is critically needed but a hike in the bridge tolls would disproportionately put the burden of financing this investment on East Bay residents. As an East Bay legislator, this inequity is not something that I can support.

The Truth in Solicitation Act by Assemblymember Tim Grayson is Signed Into Law by Governor Brown

(SACRAMENTO) This afternoon, AB 492, the Truth in Solicitation Act authored by Assemblymember Grayson (D-Concord) was signed by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. AB 492 protects consumers from deceptive solicitation practices by requiring private solicitation mailers to clearly disclose that they are not affiliated with the government.

Upon passage Assemblymember Grayson stated, “I want to thank Governor Brown for signing this bill into law. Our friends and family, especially our aging population most susceptible to scams, should not be subject to business practices that rely on misleading solicitations represented as government documents. This predatory behavior has no place in California, and I’m pleased that the Governor is joining with me in taking a stand for consumers across the state.”

Bay Area bridges tolls on the rise

Among the bill’s critics is Concord Assemblymember Tim Grayson, who wrote in an op-ed earlier this month that toll hikes stick it to bridge users while non-bridge users reap the benefits.

“Politically this makes sense: the fewer people made to pay and the more people who benefit, the more likely it is that the measure will pass,” writes Grayson. “[But] is it fair to place the burden so disproportionately on one segment of our region?”

Voters to decide on raising bridge tolls to fund $4.45 billion in transportation funding

State lawmakers approved a bill that will ask voters to OK a $3 toll hike on all Bay Area bridges except on the Golden Gate Bridge.

Last week the state Legislature passed SB 595, which will now ask voters in all nine Bay Area counties to decide on whether to phase in the rate increase. For some local commuters, that could add up to as much as $9 to cross the Bay, money which will then go toward beefing up the region's existing infrastructure and transit agencies.

Voters will now get the chance in either November or June of next year to pass the bill with a simple majority.

The bill has already faced pushback from local commuter advocates and Bay Area lawmakers, with California State Assembly members Catharine Baker (R-San Ramon), Tim Grayson (D-Concord) and Jim Frazier (D-Brentwood) voting no on the measure.

$4.4 Billion Bay Area Transportation Plan — to Be Paid for by Higher Bridge Tolls — Sent to Governor

If you live in the Bay Area, you’ll be hearing a lot about Senate Bill 595 over the next year or so. If you’re a regular user of any of the region’s seven state-owned toll bridges — that’s all of them, except the Golden Gate Bridge — you’ll want to pay close attention.

Several Contra Costa County legislators — Assemblymember Tim Grayson and Congressman Mark DeSaulnier among them — opposed SB 595, saying that it’s 1) a regressive tax and 2) a ripoff for the residents of the East Bay.